Domestic Violence Power & Control Wheel

It’s been awhile since this was originally posted so we thought we should bring it to the forefront of people’s awareness.

This wheel is used to understand the complicated dynamics of domestic violence and some of the forms it can take.  Domestic violence as you can see is not just physical.

To learn more about the Power and Control Wheel, visit the Home of the Duluth Model online.

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Domestic Violence and Pets

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Facts About Animal Abuse & Domestic Violence

The American Humane Society in association with the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence reports:

Why it Matters

  • 71% of pet-owning women entering women’s shelters reported that their batterer had injured, maimed, killed or threatened family pets for revenge or to psychologically control victims; 32% reported their children had hurt or killed animals.
  • 68% of battered women reported violence towards their animals. 87% of these incidents occurred in the presence of the women, and 75% in the presence of the children, to psychologically control and coerce them.
  • 13% of intentional animal abuse cases involve domestic violence.
  • Between 25% and 40% of battered women are unable to escape abusive situations because they worry about what will happen to their pets or livestock should they leave.
  • Pets may suffer unexplained injuries, health problems, permanent disabilities at the hands of abusers, or disappear from home.
  • Abusers kill, harm, or threaten children’s pets to coerce them into sexual abuse or to force them to remain silent about abuse. Disturbed children kill or harm animals to emulate their parents’ conduct, to prevent the abuser from killing the pet, or to take out their aggressions on another victim.
  • In one study, 70% of animal abusers also had records for other crimes. Domestic violence victims whose animals were abused saw the animal cruelty as one more violent episode in a long history of indiscriminate violence aimed at them and their vulnerability.
  • Investigation of animal abuse is often the first point of social services intervention for a family in trouble.
  • For many battered women, pets are sources of comfort providing strong emotional support: 98% of Americans consider pets to be companions or members of the family.
  • Animal cruelty problems are people problems. When animals are abused, people are at risk.

Why do abusers batter pets?

  • To demonstrate power and control over the family
  • To isolate the victim and children
  • To enforce submission
  • To perpetuate an environment of fear
  • To prevent the victim from leaving or coerce her to return
  • To punish for leaving or showing independence

At this time some states have pet protective orders.  This is a step in the right direction in the effort to protect humans and pets from domestic violence.  The following is a chart of which states have those orders and which don’t at this current time.

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Congresswoman Katherine Clark (D-MA) and Congresswoman Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R-FL) introduced the Pets and Women Safety (PAWS) Act of 2015, bipartisan legislation to help the estimated one-third of domestic violence victims who prolong their abusive relationships out of concern for the wellbeing of their pets.

“Sadly, domestic violence is something one in every four women will experience at some point in their lives,” said Congresswoman Clark. “This isolating experience is made even worse for those who fear for the safety of their pet. Most pet lovers, including me, consider their beloved dog or cat a part of their family. No one should have to make the choice between leaving an abusive situation and ensuring their pet’s safety. ”

“Many states allow pets to be included in restraining orders, but what happens when a domestic violence victim must go live with family in another state where pets are not covered?” said Michael Markarian, chief program and policy officer of The Humane Society of the United States. “We must have a national policy that safeguards the pets of abuse victims, and recognizes that domestic violence impacts all members of the family—including the four-legged.”

Candlelight Ceremony & Open House

On April 30, 2013 Caring House held a Candlelight Ceremony in honor of the survivors of sexual assault.

Caring House also used that opportunity to invite the community to an open house.

We would like to share some of the images from these events with you:

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Murder and Domestic Violence

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On April 28, 2013, Patricia Waschbisch was murdered in her home.  In light of the shock, horror and confusion about how someone who worked in the domestic violence field could herself allegedly be a victim of domestic violence murder, we are posting a statement from Rainbow House Domestic Violence Services to our blog.  We know that at times we get a picture in our heads about what a victim should be.  A victim can look like anyone.

With the release of more information about the murder of our leader,
Trish Waschbisch, many are asking how a domestic violence victim
advocate could herself be a victim of domestic violence. To those questions, Rainbow House provides this response.

Part of the tragedy of domestic violence homicide is that it leaves so
many questions unanswered. As much as we would like to hear from
Trish, to know what she was going through, to better understand this
horrible act, we never will.

Therefore, to honor Trish’s memory and legacy, we should focus our
attention and the conversation about her death on what we do know.

First, domestic violence never happens because of something the victim
did or didn’t do. To imply anything to the contrary is unjust to the
victim and minimizes the responsibility of the offender.

Second, domestic violence can happen to anyone. We should never think
someone is immune. Although it is understandable, we should not be
shocked that domestic violence is perpetrated against an advocate or a
police officer or a community leader. We should not be shocked because
domestic violence is not something the victim controls.

Third, we should not be shocked that an advocate was a victim because
domestic violence is solely the choice and responsibility of the offender. What should be truly shocking is that Brent Kaempf allegedly took Trish’s life. We should never become so desensitized to the perpetration of domestic violence that we lose sight of the perpetrator’s role and sole responsibility. We should be shocked that a man who attended domestic violence victim fundraisers, who knew what domestic violence was all about because of his partner’s work, would allegedly himself commit a domestic violence homicide.  It is shocking and despicable.

We believe Trish would want us to create greater awareness about
domestic violence, to break down the misconception that domestic
violence can’t happen to certain people and to refocus the conversation from what we think the victim should have done to the what the perpetrator actually did do. We ask everyone to join us in this effort.

DATING VIOLENCE

IF YOU ARE BEING

ABUSED, YOU MIGHT…

➤ Believe it’s your fault.

➤ Feel angry, sad, lonely, depressed, or confused.

➤ Feel helpless to stop the abuse.

➤ Feel threatened, humiliated, or ashamed.

➤ Feel anxious, trapped, or lonely.

➤ Worry about what might happen next.

➤ Feel like you can’t talk to family or friends.

➤ Be afraid of getting hurt.

➤ Feel protective of your boyfriend or girlfriend.

➤ Feel bad about yourself because the abuser says

you are stupid, lazy, ugly, worthless, helpless, crazy,

or things like that.

These are normal reactions

to being abused.

You are not alone.

 

IF SOMEONE YOU

KNOW IS BEING ABUSED,

YOU CAN HELP

➤ Listen. Show support. Don’t blame the victim for

the crime. Tell your friend that you’re worried about

them. Ask how you can help.

➤ Encourage your friend to seek help; give them

information about victim service providers.

➤ Avoid confronting the abuser. It could be dangerous.

➤ Instead of deciding what’s best for your friend,

help your friend make their own decisions.

➤ Find someone you can talk to about your feelings

about the situation.

SEXUAL ASSAULT STATISTICS

Statistics:

  • An average 233,986 Americans age 12 and older are sexually assaulted each year.
  •  Every 2 minutes, someone in the U.S. is sexually assaulted.

Who Are the Victims:

 Gender:

  •  1 out of every 6 American women has been the victim of an attempted or completed rape in her lifetime.
  • Among all victims, about nine out of ten are female.
  •  1 out of every 33 American men has been the victim of an attempted or completed rape in his lifetime.
  •   About 10% of all victims are male.

   Age:

  • Age of sexual assault victims: 15% are under age 12.
  • 29% are age 12-17 o
  • 44% are under age 18 o 80% are under age 30
  •  Ages 12-34 are the highest risk years
  •  Girls ages 16-19 are four times more likely than the general population to be victims of sexual assault.

 Race:  Estimated persons raped in lifetime by gender and race:

 Women 

  • 17.7% of white women
  • 18.8% of African-American women
  •  6.8% of Asian / Pacific Islander women
  •  34.1% of American Indian / Alaskan Native women
  •  24.4% mixed race women
  •  14.6% of Hispanic women

Men

  •  2.8% of white men
  •  3.3% of African-American men
  •  4.4% of mixed race men
  •  The sample size was too small to estimate for Asian/ Pacific Islander and American Indian / Alaskan Native men

Effects of Rape:

 Physical Injuries:

  • occur in 100% of completed rapes
  • occur in  39% of attempted rapes
  • 17% sexual assaults against females result in injured victims
  • 33% of victims sustain minor (bruises and chipped teeth) physical injuries
  • 5% of victims sustain major (broken bones and gunshot wounds) injuries
  • 61% of victims sustain undetermined injuries
  •  Only around 36% of injured victims receive medical care.

 Mental Health Victims of sexual assault are:

  •  3 times more likely to suffer from depression.
  •  6 times more likely to suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder.
  • 13 times more likely to abuse alcohol.
  •  26 times more likely to abuse drugs.
  •  4 times more likely to contemplate suicide.

Economic:

  • About 1 in 11 sexual assault victims reported that they suffered some economic loss as a consequence of the crime.
  • The average economic loss (in 1997) was about $200
  • Nearly 7% of victims reported losing time from work.

Caring House has a sexual assault advocate who wants to assist anyone who has experienced  sexual assault.

GARDEN OF HOPE

Caring House has been working on a project to honor victims of domestic violence.  This garden is in it’s infant stages as you can see by the pictures posted here.   Families in shelter or counseling can visit this site and receive the message that the community does care about them and the struggles they are facing with domestic violence and sexual abuse. 

Amongst the small garden patio made of bricks are memorial bricks honoring contributors, family members, friends, etc.  If you are interested in purchasing a brick to show your support to victims or if you would like to purchase a brick in memory of someone, please talk to a Caring House staff person.