Caring House is Open for Services!

Caring House and the Child Advocacy Center are considered essential businesses and are open to the public.

The Child Advocacy Center is able to conduct forensic interviews at this time. All referral protocols remain the same.  A family advocate will be available through the Child Advocacy Center for support.

Residential and non-residential client services are available.  Domestic violence, sexual assault, human trafficking, and secondary victim services can be done online, over the phone, or in an emergency, done in person.

Caring House and the Child Advocacy Center will follow all current CDC guidelines and social distancing protocols.  We ask that in an emergency you call the Caring House’s crisis line at 906-774-1112.  You will be able to talk with an advocate 24/7.

If you are currently utilizing Caring House or Child Advocacy services and would like to talk with your advocate, please call the Crisis line and set up an appointment.  All Caring House and Child Advocacy Center advocates have downloaded Zoom and are able to do face to face, online appointments.

We understand that this is a very difficult time.  If you are unable to call the crisis line and need emergency assistance, you can text 911 for help.

We are Hiring!!

Would you like to make a difference in your community?   Please consider joining us as a Shelter Advocate!

You can find our job ad posted on the Pure Michigan Talent Connect site at the link below:

https://jobs.mitalent.org/job-seeker/job-details/JobCode/9152391

You can also email your resume and cover letter to caringhouseim@gmail.com or drop it off in person at our office.

Caring House, Inc. is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

 

Denim Day

Denim Day started as a reaction to a 1998 Italian Supreme Court of Appeals ruling that overturned a 45-year-old man’s rape conviction.  The Court claimed that since the 18-year-old victim was forced to help the rapist remove the very tight jeans she was wearing, he couldn’t have raped her–it must have been consensual sex.

Within a matter of hours, women in the Italian Parliament protested and came to work dressed in jeans.  The protests spread to the United States, and the first Denim Day was recognized in April 1999, and continues to be recognized every April.

Here at Caring House, we recognize Denim Day by wearing jeans to work.  We also have Denim Day pins that we have been handing out as a reminder that there is no excuse for rape and that no clothing serves as an invitation to rape.

There is no excuse.  Ever.

Sexual Assault Awareness Month

April is National Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM). The goal of SAAM is to raise public awareness about sexual violence and to educate communities.

The National Sexual Violence Resource Center released the following statistics:

  • Every 98 seconds someone in the United States is sexually assaulted
  • 1 in 5 women have been raped
  • 1 in 33 men have been raped

What is it about the world we live in that allows for sexual violence to exist and at an epidemic level?  Answer: Rape culture.

Rape culture is embedded in our society, and lives in our communities. Its pervasiveness reaches the shows and movies we watch, the music we listen to, where we socialize, on the streets, at school and where we work.

More often than not, it’s situations in which sexual assault, rape and general violence are ignored, trivialized, normalized or made into jokes. So how do we as a society perpetuate rape culture?  When 994 out of 1,000 perpetrators walk free, when someone is assaulted every 98 seconds, when entertainers and individuals joke about rape, when men feel entitled to verbally and physically assault women, when men who are victims are ridiculed and dismissed, when we don’t believe or support victims…. That is rape culture!!  

To truly commit to the eradication of sexual violence from our communities, we must address the root cause, and why it happens.  Community members can work to prevent sexual violence by establishing healthy and positive relationships that are based on respect, safety, and equality.  You can be a part of the solution by:

  • Being a role model for respectful behavior to those around you
  • Talking with your children about healthy sexual development and personal boundaries
  • Intervene and speak up when you see inappropriate behavior
  • Report suspected child abuse. Know what to do if you or someone you know suspects a child may be being abused
  • Educate yourself

 

Domestic Violence Education at Bay De Noc College West Campus

A group of nursing students from Bay De Noc West has been doing a class project about domestic violence.  They are collecting donations for Caring House, they have given a presentation at the college along with advocate Marti Swisher, and they put together a short video about domestic violence.   This wonderful group of students has done a great job and we are very excited to have partnered with them.

If you would like to view the video it has been published on the Caring House Facebook page.

Domestic Violence Power & Control Wheel

It’s been awhile since this was originally posted so we thought we should bring it to the forefront of people’s awareness.

This wheel is used to understand the complicated dynamics of domestic violence and some of the forms it can take.  Domestic violence as you can see is not just physical.

To learn more about the Power and Control Wheel, visit the Home of the Duluth Model online.

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